;   Medical Translation Insight: Translation quality is easy to understand, hard to do - ForeignExchange Translations

Translation quality is easy to understand, hard to doEverybody wants good translation quality - suppliers, tool makers, clients, and end-users. But few people have figured out how to reliably and consistently achieve that.

One of the big challenges that faces buyers and providers alike is how to go about improving translation quality. Do you attempt a "big bang" innovation or embark on a process of many small, incremental improvements?

An article in the New Yorker about Toyota's approach clearly argues in favor of the latter:

...defining innovation as an incremental process, in which the goal is not to make huge, sudden leaps but, rather, to make things better on a daily basis. (The principle is often known by its Japanese name, kaizen—continuous improvement.) Instead of trying to throw long touchdown passes, as it were, Toyota moves down the field by means of short and steady gains. And so it rejects the idea that innovation is the province of an elect few; instead, it's taken to be an everyday task for which everyone is responsible.
As Toyota's recent problems have highlighted, it's not that this system can 100% guarantee that there are no quality issues. But over the long term, the results speak for themselves.

And that brings us back to translation. ForeignExchange's methodology of measurable translation quality takes a similar approach - continuous improvement rather than attempting a "big bang". Easy to understand, for sure, but difficult to do.

If you want to know more of our "secret sauce", attend some of our quality-related audio conferences:
ForeignExchange is the only company that provides clients with measurable translation quality. Our METRiQ quality system provides medical device and pharmaceutical companies with known translation quality - on every assignment. Find out more!
 
 

5 Comments:

  1. document translation said...
    Toyota moves down the field by means of short and steady gains. And so it rejects the idea that innovation is the province of an elect few; instead, it's taken to be an everyday task for which everyone is responsible
    amaxson said...
    Humans are creatures of habit. Small, daily or weekly changes, are also more easily handled by the people affected by them rather than a large 'jump.' It would seem the small changes idea may also help the employees/people affected by the changes.
    Oliver Lawrence said...
    Quality isn't quality without continual improvement. It's an ongoing undertaking (partly as everyone else is constantly trying to move forward too), so thinking that you could just do it in a 'big bang' would be to miss the point.
    telephone interpreting said...
    I think to improve quality you need some who can see the big picture. He will then be able to divide this big picture into smaller objectives which easy for everyone to handle.
    Translation services uk said...
    To meet evolving translation needs as an organisation we sub-contract all our work to qualified translators, this allows us to be much more flexible, and select from a greater pool of resources to achieve a quality tailored service. We can spread workload over a number of translators helping to meet deadlines for companies and keeping to high quality standards.

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